Quando a gente fala em cinema pensa logo em imagens. Grandes cenários, magníficos e expressivos rostos, histórias marcantes, músicas inesquecíveis. Mas tem casos em que o que mais marca é uma frase em especial, algo único e especial como a famosa “We’re gonna need a bigger boat”, que o Roy Scheider colocou como “caco” em Jaws (o primeiro, é clalaro!). E eu tenho tanta informação cinematográfica na minha cabeça que fico, às vezes, repetindo uma frase eternamente até me lembrar de onde foi que tirei a tal frase. Frases ditas pela Meryl Streep, com direito a lembrar do tom de voz e tudo o mais, frases do Matt Dillon em Rumble Fish ou da Tippi Hedren nos filmes do Hitchcock. Sei todas, praticamente.

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Talvez as melhores frases tenham sido ditas pela Bette Davis mesmo, que é a atriz cuja carreira eu conheço melhor, desde os 15 anos de idade. Tem uma, de Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? que não significa grande coisa se dita fora de contexto ou sem lembrar da cena em si, mas que volta e meia surge na minha mente. Nesse filme, quando Bette imita a voz da sua irmã (Joan Crawford) ao telefone e pergunta ao fornecedor de bebidas, What seems to be the trouble?, eu me divirto horrores e acabo usando essa mesma frase toda vez que quero saber o que está “pegando” no trabalho ou em qualquer outra situação.
As frases mais famosas da Bette são:
ALL ABOUT EVE 1950
“Fasten your seatbelts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.”
“Everybody has a heart, except some people.”
“Bill’s thirty-two. He looks thirty-two. He looked it five years ago. He’ll look it twenty years from now. I hate men.”

CABIN IN THE COTTON 1932
“I’d luv ta kiss ya, but I just washed my hair.”
THE LETTER 1940
“With all my heart, I still love the man I killed.”
NOW, VOYAGER 1942
“Jerry, don’t let’s ask for the moon… we have the stars.”
BEYOND THE FOREST 1949
“What a dump!”
THE STAR 1952
“Come on, Oscar. Let’s you and me get drunk.”
Uma loooonga e deliciosa seleção dessas frases foi encontrada pela Fezoca e está logo abaixo. Check it out e divirta-se!


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“Oscar, you should know me well enough by now to know I don’t ask for things I don’t think I can get.” –Regina Giddens.
“Why, Alexandra. You have spirit after all. I used to think you were all sugar water.” –Regina Giddens.
THE LITTLE FOXES (1941)
“Heaven help me. I love a psychotic!” –Margo Channing.
“I’m a junkyard.” –Margo Channing.
“You’re not much of a bargain, you know. You’re conceited and thoughtless and messy.” –Margo Channing
“Remind me to tell you about the time I looked into the heart of an artichoke.” –Margo Channing.
“I’m so happy you’re happy.” –Margo Channing.
“Fasten your seatbelts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.” –Margo Channing
“Everybody has a heart, except some people.” –Margo Channing.
“Bill’s thirty-two. He looks thirty-two. He looked it five years ago. He’ll look it twenty years from now. I hate men.” –Margo Channing.
ALL ABOUT EVE (1950).
“This is 1852, dumplin’, 1852 — not the dark ages. Girls don’t have to simper around in white just because they’re not married.” –as Julie Marsden in JEZEBEL (1938).
I can learn more from you in five minutes than from anyone else in five years.” –as Grace Blair in THE MAN WHO PLAYED GOD (1932).
“I’d luv ta kiss ya, but I just washed my hair.”–as Madge in CABIN IN THE COTTON (1932)
“Cu-ute!” –as Madge in CABIN IN THE COTTON (1932).
“No one has any rights about me except me.” –as Helen Bauer in EX-LADY (1933).
“I went away from home to be on my own. I don’t want to be like my mother, a ‘yes’ woman for some man. I want to be a person of my own.” –as Helen Bauer in EX-LADY (1933).
“I don’t mind.” –as Mildred Rogers in OF HUMAN BONDAGE (1934).
“Good riddance to bad rubbish.” –as Mildred Rogers in OF HUMAN BONDAGE (1934).
“I’m going to prove I’m as good a reporter as any man.” –as Ellen Garfield in FRONT PAGE WOMAN (1935).
“Hurt me? You delight me! You’ve the most amazing lack of humor of anyone I’ve ever known!” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“I’d rather be drunk than sober.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“I’m humiliated to the point where I must thank you.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“Helping Joyce Heath is like shaking hands with the devil.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“There’s one little piggy who’s going to market in a shocking state of nudity.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“I’ve been betrayed so often by tomorrows, I don’t dare promise them.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“I’m bad for people. I don’t mean to be but I can’t help myself.” –as Joyce Heath in DANGEROUS (1935).
“You cad! You dirty swine! I never cared for you–not once! I was always making a fool of ya. Ya bored me stiff. I hated ya. It made me sick when I had to let ya kiss me. I only did it because you begged me–ya hounded me and drove me crazy! And after you kissed me, I always used to wipe my mouth. Wipe my mouth!” –as Mildred Rogers in OF HUMAN BONDAGE (1934)
“Oh, I don’t want to ever marry. I want to be always free.” –as Gabby Maple in THE PETRIFIED FOREST (1936).
“If you could read my mind, you’d shrivel where you stand.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“I can’t understand why a man I’m so crazy about takes such a fiendish delight in tormenting me.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“Dearest, I think you’re the lowest thing that ever crawled, but as long as I can reach out and get my hands on you, no other man will ever touch me.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“From head to foot, I’m one quivering mass of loathing.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“Sweet place for a murderer.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“Good! Let’s have blood and destruction.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“You’re going to have love for breakfast, love for luncheon and love for dinner. Sweet, sugary, sticky worship. You’re going to have a steady diet of it till you’re ready to scream — you billy goat!” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“You cad! You can’t even be on the level about killing yourself!” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“I do resent being called a cat.” –as Joyce Arden in IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER (1937).
“Anyway, if I wanted to end up in the river, I’d have taken a jump off the Brooklyn Bridge five years ago.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“Some will wind up in the short end, but not me, baby. I know all the angles, and I think I’m smart enough to keep one step ahead of them–till I get enough to pack it all in and live on Easy Street the rest of my life.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“If I weren’t in such a hurry, I’d break right down and cry.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“I’ll get you–even if I have to crawl back from my grave to do it.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“I got things wrong with me that all the doctors in the world can’t fix.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“I’m 23 years old — an only child. I weigh 110 pounds stripped. I’ve had measles, mumps and whooping cough, all at the proper ages. I believe I have no congenital weaknesses. Shall I go on?… My father drank himself to death. My mother lives in Paris. I take a great deal of exercise. I’m accustomed to a reasonable quantity of tobacco and alcohol. I’m said to have a sense of humor. Is that enough?” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“If this is what you call living, I don’t want any part of it.” –as Mary Dwight in MARKED WOMAN (1937).
“Nothing can hurt us now… What we have can’t be destroyed… That’s our victory… Our victory over the dark.” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
answering the phone: “This is Miss Judith Traherne of the sleeping Trahernes.” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“Doctor, will you do something for me? When you get inside my head, see if you can find any sense in it.” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“Thank you for my life. What can I do for you?” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“Darling, poor fool, don’t you know I’m in love with you?” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“I think I’ll have a large order of prognosis negative.” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“It’s the waiting–day-in and day-out. Would I be wrong if I made it happen?” –as Judith Traherne in DARK VICTORY (1939).
“At this moment, I could be the happiest woman in the world if…” –as Empress Carlotta in JUAREZ (1939).
“I’m so excited, I want to laugh and cry at the same time.” –as Charlotte Lovell in THE OLD MAID (1939).
“I don’t say nice things nicely.” –as Aunt Charlotte in THE OLD MAID (1939).
“The necessities of a queen must transcend those of a woman.” –as Queen Elizabeth I in THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939).
“To be a queen is to be less than human; to put pride before desire; to search men’s hearts for tenderness and find only ambition; to cry out in the dark for one unselfish voice and hear only the rustle of papers of state; to turn to ones beloved with stars for eyes and have him see behind me only the shadow of the executioner’s block. A queen has no hour for love. Time presses. Events crowd upon her. A shell. An empty, glittering husk. She must give up all a woman holds most dear.” –as Queen Elizabeth I in THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939).
“Naturally… It’s against all nature that I should suffer so.” –as Queen Elizabeth I in THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939).
“I’m only a woman. Must I carry the weight of the world–alone?” –as Queen Elizabeth I in THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939).
“Well, Monsieur, a person in my position must be content with picking up a few crumbs of happiness from other people’s tables.” –as Henriette Deluzy-Desportes in ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO (1940).
“Happiness isn’t a little cake we can cut up to satisfy our appetite.” –as Henriette Deluzy-Desportes in ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO (1940).
“There are some things it’s useless to fight against, Monsieur, and one is another woman’s jealousy.” –as Henriette Deluzy-Desportes in ALL THIS, AND HEAVEN TOO (1940).
“You know, there are men who think it’s their duty to flirt with women whenever they have the chance. I believe they think women expect it of them.” –as Leslie Crosby in THE LETTER (1940).
“With all my heart, I still love the man I killed.” –as Leslie Crosby in THE LETTER (1940).
“I don’t ask for things I don’t think I can get.” –as Regina Giddens in THE LITTLE FOXES (1941).
“You sound like a book, and a very cheap one.” –as Maggie in THE GREAT LIE (1941).
“The usual thing. ‘Do you?’ ‘I do.’ ‘Kiss the bride.’ ‘Have some cake.'” –as Maggie in THE GREAT LIE (1941).
“But you wouldn’t! You couldn’t!” –as Maggie in THE GREAT LIE (1941).
“I always know what I’m doing.” –as Stanley Timberlake in IN THIS OUR LIFE (1942).
“I guess I’m kill or cure.” –as Stanley Timberlake in IN THIS OUR LIFE (1942).
“I might even turn out to be a good wife. Imagine me being a good wife.” –as Stanley Timberlake in IN THIS OUR LIFE (1942).
“Jerry, don’t let’s ask for the moon… we have the stars.” –as Charlotte Vale in NOW, VOYAGER (1942).
“I always have the feeling you’re laughing at me, and I find that attractive–besides the fact you’re very rich.” –as Fanny Trellis in MR. SKEFFINGTON (1944).
“I have never talked to a man for more than five minutes in my life without wanting to box his ears.” –as Miss Lilly Moffat in THE CORN IS GREEN (1945).
What a dump!” as Rosa Moline in BEYOND THE FOREST (1949).
“There’s only one person in this town that does anybody a real favor. That’s the undertaker–carries them out.” –as Rosa Moline in BEYOND THE FOREST (1949)
“I don’t want people to like me. Nothing pleases me more than when they don’t like me–means I don’t belong.” –as Rosa Moline in BEYOND THE FOREST (1949).
“If I don’t get out of here, I’ll die. If I don’t get out of here, I hope I die… and burn.” –as Rosa Moline in BEYOND THE FOREST (1949).
“Going… going… gone.” –as Margaret Elliot in THE STAR (1952).
“Come on, Oscar. Let’s you and me get drunk.” –as Margaret Elliot in THE STAR (1952).
“I wonder if you can guess who I am.” –as Jane Hudson in WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE (1962).
“Loved? You never loved anybody but yourself!”–as Edith Phillips in DEAD RINGER (1964)
“You’re a vile, sorry little bitch.” –as Charlotte in HUSH… HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE (1965).
“Very well, Master Joey. I swear.” –as Nanny in THE NANNY (1965).

3 thoughts on “Fala, Bette!

  1. Fezoca
    (primeiro que tudo, maravilha que que agora os nossos dados ficam guardades em cookies gostosos)
    Meus amores:
    está lindo…
    Mas é verdade que o Moa sabe tudo, é?
    Pensei que fosse só da Tippi ou da Merryl.
    Olhe, o melhor trasbalho que já vi.
    Um fonte de refer~encia . Uma verdadeira enciclopédia.
    beijos e mais
    beijos

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